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Nsikan’s Young Life with Poetry

Upcoming HoCoPoLitSo Events

  • Carrie and John Brown -- A Family Affair June 4, 2017 at 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm Slayton House, 10400 Cross Fox Ln, Columbia, MD 21044, USA HoCoPoLitSo’s Celebration of Columbia’s 50th Birthday John Gregory Brown and Carrie Brown. Presented in partnership with Wilde Lake Community Association.
  • Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie at the Howard County Library June 10, 2017 the Howard County Library

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In the last few months, we heard from Katy Day and Faheem Dyer about what poetry means to them.  Today, in the last part of our series on young people on poetry and literature, we hear from Nsikan-Abasi Akpan.  She is a student at Howard Community College and an aspiring writer.

 

Nsikan reading her poem to Taylor Mali

Nsikan reading her poem to Taylor Mali

What do you get out of literary events like Taylor Mali’s reading at Blackbird Poetry Festival?

I recently met slam Poet Taylor Mali. He is a fire that enhances the light in others. It was nice spending time with him and the HoCoPoLitSo team and seeing that he doesn’t do what he does just for the stage – it’s inside of him. Poetry is inside of me and meeting him has encouraged me to not force my way into it, but rather to allow it to come naturally, perhaps when I least expect it to.

As a student and as a citizen of this world, what benefits do you see in reading and studying literature (especially poetry)?

The benefits of studying literature is growth. I spend many days cooped up in my room like a hermit, watching documentaries of great writers like Jack Kerouac and George Eliot, but it doesn’t mean I’m up to no good.  It sounds silly, but when I get anxious (mostly due to my fear of not making it as a writer), I remember the struggles of J.D. Salinger and how he had to try many times before The New Yorker accepted his work; when I feel misunderstood, I think about Virginia Woolf and how she never truly fit in; an most importantly, when I find myself almost giving into anger and sin, I think of God and how He has given me poetry.  Then I recite a poem in my head and end with “Amen” – and all is well again.

What’s your favorite piece of literature (a particular poem, poet, or novel maybe)?

“You might as well have asked, “What’s your favorite grain of sand?” Am I allowed to have a favorite? It’s just too much, but I’ll tell you this: In Stephen Chbosky’s book “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” the main character, Charlie, is asked what his favorite book is. His answer: “The one I just read,” or something like that. I just read “Catholicism,” a poem by Billy Collins, so for this moment, that is my favorite poem.

Do you have any thoughts on what literary organizations like HoCoPoLitSo might do to encourage more young people to read, study, and encounter poetry?

Who says poets aren't silly?

Who says poets aren’t silly? Katy and Nsikan share a moment with Taylor Mali 

To some crazy people out there, poetry is no longer important. I once heard someone say “Poetry is dead.” Of course that person only said so because they were feeling bitter about failing the poetry unit in English class, but still we live in a world where such statements seem almost true. HoCoPoLitSo reminds us, though, that people who love poetry still exist, that poetry lives. It was through HoCoPoLitSo that I met Billy Collins and was able to recite my poem, “Frank,” right in front of him. HoCoPoLitSo is energetic and on the ball of everything literary, and young people need that. By providing the opportunity to not only read poetry , but also to meet the poets and share our own works, HoCoPoLitSo encourages us to stay involved and to stay in touch with literature.  There are also local sources, like HCC’s literary magazine, The Muse, which bring us closer to literature.  Young people are willing when it comes to being a part of the poetry world. It’s absolutely magical.

Rest assured, poetry lovers everywhere, that young people like Katy, Faheem, and Nsikan will become stewards of all that is beautiful and magical in the world of language and literature. But you and I have to support them, so that they can continue to spark and renew their energy.

And I promise you this – your support of HoCoPoLitSo will continue to foster their love of poetry and literature. Katy, Faheem, and Nsikan are the reason that HoCoPoLitSo does what it does.

– Laura Yoo

Member, HoCoPoLitSo Board of Directors

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